Voting early in the 2020 election: What you need to know

Eldis Sula
October 23, 2020 - 12:01 am

Many Americans are carefully preparing to make sure their vote counts this year.

Saturday, Oct. 24 is the first Vote Early Day in history.

The day is a movement of nonprofits, businesses, election administrators, and creatives working to ensure all Americans know their options to vote early, according to the official Vote Early Day site.

Learn what your options are for voting early in the 2020 election below.

Why should I vote early?

Voting early is a good way to avoid last-minute hiccups that will prevent your vote from being counted in the presidential election.

While 40% of Americans voted early during the last presidential election, many states are expanding options for voters to cast their ballots early amid the unprecedented effects of the pandemic.

By taking the proper steps to make sure you are aware of your state’s voting protocols, you are not only making sure your voice is heard, but you are helping keep lines short on Election Day as well.

How can I vote early?

There are a few different ways that you can vote early in this election. They include:

Early in-person voting: Most states allow voters to cast ballots in person before Nov. 3. Dates, locations and requirements for voting in-person vary state by state.

Voting by mail: Due to the coronavirus pandemic, more states than ever are allowing their residents to vote by mail.

Procedures and deadlines for voting by mail also vary from state to state around the country.

While some states will automatically conduct voting by mail this year, residents in some states may need to request a mail-in ballot. Additionally, in some states, people need to provide an excuse as to why they can’t vote in person.

Some states will also allow voters to drop off their mail-in ballots in person at designated location if they prefer this method to sending in the mail.

How early should I send my ballot in?

Experts advise that Americans vote sooner rather than later for this election.

Because many more Americans are expected to vote by mail than usual, election officials are staffing up, conducting new training and changing their processes to be prepared.

The USPS recommends that voters mail in their ballot at least one week before their state’s deadline to receive them, reports Time.

Where can I learn more about my voting options this year?

Visit Vote: Make It Count at RADIO.COM/vote for updates, resources and other important information about how to vote and the election process.

LISTEN NOW on the RADIO.COM App
Follow RADIO.COM
Facebook | Twitter | Instagram